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To: Mayor Robert Garcia, Long Beach City Council, Staycee Dains (Director of Animal Care Services)

Ban the declawing of cats in Long Beach, CA

Ban the declawing of cats in Long Beach, CA

Why is Long Beach lagging behind other California cities in banning this cruel and unnecessary procedure?

People often mistakenly believe that declawing their cats is a harmless "quick fix" for unwanted scratching. They don't realize that declawing can make a cat less likely to use the litter box or more likely to bite. Declawing can also cause lasting physical problems and lead to the cat being surrendered to a shelter due to behavioral or health issues.

Too often, people think that declawing is a simple surgery that removes a cat's nails—the equivalent of having your fingernails trimmed. Sadly, this is far from the truth. Declawing traditionally involves the amputation of the last bone of each toe. If performed on a human being, it would be like cutting off each finger at the last knuckle.

The American Veterinary Medicine Association discourages declawing as an elective procedure and supports non-surgical alternatives. It is an unnecessary surgery that provides no medical benefit to the cat. Educated pet parents can easily train their cats to use their claws in a manner that allows everyone in the household to live together happily.

In 2003, West Hollywood became the first city in the country to ban declawing. Since then, cities such as Berkeley, Beverly Hills, Burbank, Culver City, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Santa Monica have joined them. New York has a statewide ban.

Isn't it time for Long Beach to do the right thing for cats and ban declawing?

Why is this important?

People often mistakenly believe that declawing their cats is a harmless "quick fix" for unwanted scratching. They don't realize that declawing can make a cat less likely to use the litter box or more likely to bite. Declawing can also cause lasting physical problems and lead to the cat being surrendered to a shelter due to behavioral or health issues.

Too often, people think that declawing is a simple surgery that removes a cat's nails—the equivalent of having your fingernails trimmed. Sadly, this is far from the truth. Declawing traditionally involves the amputation of the last bone of each toe. If performed on a human being, it would be like cutting off each finger at the last knuckle.

The American Veterinary Medicine Association discourages declawing as an elective procedure and supports non-surgical alternatives. It is an unnecessary surgery that provides no medical benefit to the cat. Educated pet parents can easily train their cats to use their claws in a manner that allows everyone in the household to live together happily.

In 2003, West Hollywood became the first city in the country to ban declawing. Since then, cities such as Berkeley, Beverly Hills, Burbank, Culver City, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Santa Monica have joined them. New York has a statewide ban.

Isn't it time for Long Beach to do the right thing for cats and ban declawing?

Long Beach, CA, USA

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Reasons for signing

  • There is no reason to mutilate cats in this way!

Updates

2021-07-25 14:37:30 -0500

100 signatures reached

2021-07-24 11:37:40 -0500

50 signatures reached

2021-07-23 21:04:33 -0500

25 signatures reached

2021-07-23 17:32:52 -0500

10 signatures reached