Helping Cats Where They Are

Community cats (aka stray or free-roaming cats) risk losing their lives simply because they've made a home in the outdoors. In many cases, they are brought to local shelters, where they are unlikely to get adopted because many of them aren't socialized to people.

That's where community cat programs come in. These programs use trap-neuter-return (TNR) to save cats. The process is simple: Community cats are trapped, evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, ear-tipped, spayed or neutered, and returned to their outdoor homes, unable to have kittens.

And these programs are already working around the country.

Help save the lives of community cats by advocating for trap-neuter-return programs in your area.

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Campaigns (16)

  • Los Angeles
    Los Angeles supports its community and its cats
    Nearly 10 years after the L.A. City Council committed to making the city a no-kill community, the struggle continues. Although the 90% threshold was achieved for dogs four years ago, lifesaving efforts for cats have been much more challenging. However, a program currently under consideration would likely push L.A. over the top. The greatest barrier to saving more cats has been a legal injunction preventing the City from any involvement with trap-neuter-return (TNR) programs. As a result, the number of young kittens entering L.A. shelters is on the rise in recent years, overwhelming available resources. Last month, the City released the details of its long-awaited Citywide Cat Program, which allocates funding for the surgical sterilization of 20,000 free-roaming cats annually, over and above those funds already allocated for residents’ pets. The process is simple: cats are caught, evaluated by veterinarians, sterilized, vaccinated, and returned to their original location. This promises to be a game-changer without hampering any of the progress already made—overturning the injunction and paving the way for L.A. to become the largest no-kill community in the country.
    4,559 of 5,000 Signatures
    Created by Kaitlyn S. Picture
  • Virginians support humane methods for managing cats
    Despite strong support from the Virginia Senate, a sub-committee in the House of Delegates voted to table Senate Bill 1390, which — if passed — would have clarified that trap-neuter-return (TNR) programs are legal throughout the state, helping facilitate lifesaving practices for Virginia's community cats. Let's show the Virginia House of Delegates that our communities care about enacting lifesaving legislation for Virginia's cats. With enough signatures, we can ensure stronger support for this important legislation next time around. Please sign and share this petition today.
    610 of 800 Signatures
    Created by April M. Picture
  • Riverside
    Support Community Cat programs in Riverside
    Community cats (aka stray or free-roaming cats) risk losing their lives simply because they've made a home in the outdoors. In many cases, they are brought to local shelters, where they are unlikely to get adopted because many of them aren't socialized to people. Many of these cats are thriving living outdoors because someone in their community cares for them. That's where community cat programs come in. These programs use trap-neuter-return (TNR) to save cats. The process is simple: Community cats are trapped, evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, ear-tipped, and returned to their outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. Three years ago, in partnership with Best Friends, Riverside County Dept. Of Animal Services took on this approach by welcoming a community cat program at their Coachella Valley Animal Campus location. By early 2020, as many as 10,000 eligible cats were spayed and neutered through the program. The work continues today on a smaller scale due to physical and financial limitations brought on by the pandemic, leaving many community members and cats without this necessary resource. You can help save the lives of community cats and support the people who care for them, by advocating for community cat programs and other lifesaving efforts to be implemented throughout Riverside County. Thank you for supporting community cats in your neighborhood, and for everything that you do for the animals!
    548 of 600 Signatures
    Created by Carolina R. Picture
  • Protect Alaska's community cats
    Help support saving the lives of community cats by advocating for lifesaving programs in your area. Please sign and share this petition to show that you support safe, humane and positive solutions for cats living in your community. Current state rules and regulations severely hamper any lifesaving efforts focused on community cats. Alaska's Board of Game has been considering rule changes that could impact cats and the people who care for them. These changes have been pushed to early 2022. Alaska’s residents deserve TNVR (trap-neuter-vaccinate-return) programs, which are animal-friendly, cost-effective, and reduce the burden and bureaucracy placed on the state’s animal shelters. The process is simple: Community cats are trapped, evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, ear-tipped, and returned to their outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. The simple truth is that current methods of animal control relative to community cats are expensive, ineffective and often inhumane. Rule changes allowing TNVR programs would be better for the cats, for public health and for the wildlife we all want to protect.
    518 of 600 Signatures
    Created by Kaitlyn S. Picture
  • Midland
    Continue funding our shelter and community needs
    The voucher program provides local community members and pets with much-needed resources. It also reduces the number of animals coming into the shelter and decreases the number of pets euthanized, too. Through this program, Midland community members have access to affordable spay/neuter for their dogs and cats. This allows them to retain ownership of their pets while providing medical care and ultimately keeping the stray population down. Continuing this funding at full capacity based on current needs is critical for managing stray populations in Midland, TX. This could lead to a rise in shelter intake creating overcrowded conditions and higher euthanasia rates. This would take a toll on shelter staff and local residents who would no longer have access to resources to help create solutions at a community level.
    317 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Kaitlyn S. Picture
  • Trenton
    Street Cats Need our Help
    In 2016 I found the West Orange TNVR Program. It took a year and a half to get this approved and an ordinance allowing us to TNVR in West Orange, NJ. Unfortunately, surrounding towns do not do any TNR and it is sad how the population is growing and how these animals are suffering. This can be address with support from our legislatures. West Orange TNVR receives no financial support from the township. We depend strictly on donations and fundraisers. We are all volunteers and home based. To date we have spay/neutered 1086 street cats and adopted 623 kittens and adult cats. We have had inoculation, amputations, wounds and many URI We do all we can to save a life.
    301 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Judith S.
  • Provo
    Tell the City Council: Support Lifesaving Programs for Cats
    Trap-Neuter-Return is an animal-friendly, veterinarian-approved, and cost-effective method for keeping free-roaming cats safe, healthy, and out of shelters while reducing their numbers over time. The cats are humanely trapped then sterilized and vaccinated before being returned to the place where they were found. And these programs are already working around the country. Community cat programs utilize trap-neuter-return (TNR) which is an animal-friendly, veterinarian-approved, and cost-effective method for keeping free-roaming cats safe, healthy, and out of shelters — while reducing their numbers over time. The cats are humanely trapped then sterilized and vaccinated before being returned to the place where they were found. Lifesaving programs like these are proven to be the most cost-effective, veterinarian-approved, and animal-friendly solution for controlling and reducing free-roaming cat populations. Rally your community to expand resources to keep people and pets safe and healthy by advocating for lifesaving programs throughout your state. Your voice is a critical part of ensuring that pets and people have access to positive programs and resources. Become part of a driven and diverse group of people who believe that all pets and people deserve compassion, and that -- when we work together -- we can create real change for pets in need.
    226 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Jeff W. Picture
  • Baytown
    Baytown Supports its Community and its Cats
    Community cats (aka stray or free-roaming cats) risk losing their lives simply because they've made a home in the outdoors. In many cases, they are brought to local shelters, where they are unlikely to get adopted because many of them aren't socialized to people. Community cat programs use trap-neuter-return (TNR) to save cats. The process is simple: Community cats are trapped, evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, and returned to their outdoor homes, unable to have kittens.
    148 of 200 Signatures
    Created by 2025_Action_Team N. Picture
  • Laredo
    Support the animals and community of Laredo
    You are a critical part of ensuring that pets and people have access to positive programs and resources. It is important your representatives know that saving cats and dogs is important to the people of Laredo. The good news is that you can be a part of supporting positive programs that are working around Texas. Some examples include community cat programming (see below), foster programming (to provide temporary housing to pets prior to finding their permanent homes), and progressive field services and resources to ensure people have what they need to keep their pets. The community as a whole- shelter, pets, people- can advocate for these programs and more resources to create change for animals and those who care for them. More on community cat programming: Community cats (aka stray or free-roaming cats) risk losing their lives simply because they've made a home in the outdoors. In many cases, they are brought to local shelters, where they are unlikely to get adopted because many of them aren't socialized to people. That's where community cat programs come in. These programs use trap-neuter-return (TNR) to save cats. The process is simple: Community cats are trapped, evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, ear-tipped, and returned to their outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. And these programs are already working around the country. The people of Laredo deserve TNVR (trap-neuter-vaccinate-return) programs, which are animal-friendly, cost-effective, and reduce the burden placed on the animal shelter. -------------------------------- By advocating for these programs and continued collaboration with other community organizations, you can be part of creating a healthier community for pets and people. Together we can make sustainable changes that save lives while creating a framework of support for the pets of Laredo and the people who care about them. Thank you for supporting the dogs and cats of Laredo.
    114 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Kaitlyn S. Picture
  • Saving Innocent Cats in Utah County
    In order to create compassionate no-kill communities and achieve no-kill for cats nationwide, we need communities to support lifesaving programs like Trap-Neuter-Return [TNR]. The process is simple: cats are caught (often by volunteers), evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, and returned to their original outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. These programs are also proven to be the most cost-effective, veterinarian-approved, and animal-friendly solution for controlling and reducing free-roaming cat populations.
    107 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Kassie C. Picture