Helping Cats Where They Are

Community cats (aka stray or free-roaming cats) risk losing their lives simply because they've made a home in the outdoors. In many cases, they are brought to local shelters, where they are unlikely to get adopted because many of them aren't socialized to people.

That's where community cat programs come in. These programs use trap-neuter-return (TNR) to save cats. The process is simple: Community cats are trapped, evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, ear-tipped, spayed or neutered, and returned to their outdoor homes, unable to have kittens.

And these programs are already working around the country.

Help save the lives of community cats by advocating for trap-neuter-return programs in your area.

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Campaigns (12)

  • Los Angeles
    Los Angeles supports its community and its cats
    Nearly 10 years after the L.A. City Council committed to making the city a no-kill community, the struggle continues. Although the 90% threshold was achieved for dogs four years ago, lifesaving efforts for cats have been much more challenging. However, a program currently under consideration would likely push L.A. over the top. The greatest barrier to saving more cats has been a legal injunction preventing the City from any involvement with trap-neuter-return (TNR) programs. As a result, the number of young kittens entering L.A. shelters is on the rise in recent years, overwhelming available resources. Last month, the City released the details of its long-awaited Citywide Cat Program, which allocates funding for the surgical sterilization of 20,000 free-roaming cats annually, over and above those funds already allocated for residents’ pets. The process is simple: cats are caught, evaluated by veterinarians, sterilized, vaccinated, and returned to their original location. This promises to be a game-changer without hampering any of the progress already made—overturning the injunction and paving the way for L.A. to become the largest no-kill community in the country.
    4,533 of 5,000 Signatures
    Created by Kaitlyn S. Picture
  • Virginians support humane methods for managing cats
    Despite strong support from the Virginia Senate, a sub-committee in the House of Delegates voted to table Senate Bill 1390, which — if passed — would have clarified that trap-neuter-return (TNR) programs are legal throughout the state, helping facilitate lifesaving practices for Virginia's community cats. Let's show the Virginia House of Delegates that our communities care about enacting lifesaving legislation for Virginia's cats. With enough signatures, we can ensure stronger support for this important legislation next time around. Please sign and share this petition today.
    568 of 600 Signatures
    Created by April M. Picture
  • Protect Alaska's community cats
    Help support saving the lives of community cats by advocating for lifesaving programs in your area. Please sign and share this petition to show that you support safe, humane and positive solutions for cats living in your community. Current state rules and regulations severely hamper any lifesaving efforts focused on community cats. Alaska's Board of Game has been considering rule changes that could impact cats and the people who care for them. These changes have been pushed to early 2022. Alaska’s residents deserve TNVR (trap-neuter-vaccinate-return) programs, which are animal-friendly, cost-effective, and reduce the burden and bureaucracy placed on the state’s animal shelters. The process is simple: Community cats are trapped, evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, ear-tipped, and returned to their outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. The simple truth is that current methods of animal control relative to community cats are expensive, ineffective and often inhumane. Rule changes allowing TNVR programs would be better for the cats, for public health and for the wildlife we all want to protect.
    455 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Kaitlyn S. Picture
  • Riverside
    Support Community Cat programs in Riverside
    Community cats (aka stray or free-roaming cats) risk losing their lives simply because they've made a home in the outdoors. In many cases, they are brought to local shelters, where they are unlikely to get adopted because many of them aren't socialized to people. Many of these cats are thriving living outdoors because someone in their community cares for them. That's where community cat programs come in. These programs use trap-neuter-return (TNR) to save cats. The process is simple: Community cats are trapped, evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, ear-tipped, and returned to their outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. Three years ago, in partnership with Best Friends, Riverside County Dept. Of Animal Services took on this approach by welcoming a community cat program at their Coachella Valley Animal Campus location. By early 2020, as many as 10,000 eligible cats were spayed and neutered through the program. The work continues today on a smaller scale due to physical and financial limitations brought on by the pandemic, leaving many community members and cats without this necessary resource. You can help save the lives of community cats and support the people who care for them, by advocating for community cat programs and other lifesaving efforts to be implemented throughout Riverside County. Thank you for supporting community cats in your neighborhood, and for everything that you do for the animals!
    421 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Carol R. Picture
  • Trenton
    Street Cats Need our Help
    In 2016 I found the West Orange TNVR Program. It took a year and a half to get this approved and an ordinance allowing us to TNVR in West Orange, NJ. Unfortunately, surrounding towns do not do any TNR and it is sad how the population is growing and how these animals are suffering. This can be address with support from our legislatures. West Orange TNVR receives no financial support from the township. We depend strictly on donations and fundraisers. We are all volunteers and home based. To date we have spay/neutered 1086 street cats and adopted 623 kittens and adult cats. We have had inoculation, amputations, wounds and many URI We do all we can to save a life.
    268 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Judith S.
  • Baytown
    Baytown Supports its Community and its Cats
    Community cats (aka stray or free-roaming cats) risk losing their lives simply because they've made a home in the outdoors. In many cases, they are brought to local shelters, where they are unlikely to get adopted because many of them aren't socialized to people. Community cat programs use trap-neuter-return (TNR) to save cats. The process is simple: Community cats are trapped, evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, and returned to their outdoor homes, unable to have kittens.
    120 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Baytown Action T.
  • Laredo
    The people of Laredo support their community and cats
    You can help save the lives of cats in your community! Community cats (aka stray or free-roaming cats) risk losing their lives simply because they've made a home in the outdoors. In many cases, they are brought to local shelters, where they are unlikely to get adopted because many of them aren't socialized to people. That's where community cat programs come in. These programs use trap-neuter-return (TNR) to save cats. The process is simple: Community cats are trapped, evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, ear-tipped, and returned to their outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. And these programs are already working around the country. The people of Laredo deserve TNVR (trap-neuter-vaccinate-return) programs, which are animal-friendly, cost-effective, and reduce the burden placed on the animal shelter. You can help save the lives of community cats by advocating for these programs in your area. Thank you for supporting community cats in your neighborhood, and for everything that you do for the animals.
    93 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Kaitlyn S. Picture
  • Saving Innocent Cats in Utah County
    In order to create compassionate no-kill communities and achieve no-kill for cats nationwide, we need communities to support lifesaving programs like Trap-Neuter-Return [TNR]. The process is simple: cats are caught (often by volunteers), evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, and returned to their original outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. These programs are also proven to be the most cost-effective, veterinarian-approved, and animal-friendly solution for controlling and reducing free-roaming cat populations.
    72 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Kassie C. Picture
  • Houston supports its community and its cats
    You can help save the lives of cats in your community! Community cats (aka stray or free-roaming cats) risk losing their lives simply because they've made a home in the outdoors. In many cases, they are brought to local shelters, where they are unlikely to get adopted because many of them aren't socialized to people. That's where community cat programs come in. These programs use trap-neuter-return (TNR) to save cats. The process is simple: Community cats are trapped, evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, ear-tipped, and returned to their outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. And these programs are already working around the country and in Houston. You can help save the lives of community cats by advocating for these programs in your area. Thank you for supporting community cats in your neighborhood, and for everything that you do for the animals.
    32 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Kaitlyn S. Picture
  • Laredo
    Apoye programas de gatos comunitarios en Laredo
    ¿Porque esto es importante? Los gatos de la comunidad (también conocidos como gatos callejeros o ambulantes) corren el riesgo de perder la vida simplemente porque han establecido un hogar en su comunidad. En muchos casos, son llevados a refugios locales, donde es poco probable que los adopten porque muchos de ellos no están socializados con la gente. Ahí es donde entran los programas comunitarios para gatos. Estos programas usan Capturar, Esterilizar y Soltar (CES) para salvar gatos. El proceso es simple: los gatos de la comunidad son atrapados, evaluados por veterinarios, vacunados, esterilizados o castrados. Se les cortan un poco de la puntita de una oreja para identificarlos como esterilizados y devueltos a sus comunidades, sin poder tener gatitos. Puede ayudar a salvar las vidas de los gatos de la comunidad y apoyar a las personas que los cuidan, abogando por programas comunitarios de gatos y otros esfuerzos para salvar vidas que se implementarán en Laredo. ¡Gracias por apoyar a los gatos comunitarios en su vecindario y por todo lo que hacen por los animales!
    26 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Carol R. Picture