• Prevent Puppy Mill Sales in Kaysville
    More than 400 other cities, counties and states have already passed laws to ban the retail sale of pets sourced from commercial breeding facilities. It's time for our community to do the same. Puppy and kitten mills are in business to supply pet stores. The pets in these facilities often spend their entire lives in dirty, crowded cages for the sole purpose of producing as many animals as possible for the retail pet trade. Pet stores that obtain animals from these facilities are not an asset to our city. These facilities also produce puppies that are often sick, causing unsuspecting consumers to have to care for a new pet in need of expensive veterinary treatment. Milled puppies can also spread campylobacter, a dangerous, drug-resistant bacteria that is contagious to humans. Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) traced a multi-state outbreak of Campylobacter to pet store puppies. This is a public health risk in a time where public health should be a top priority. A retail pet sales ban will not prevent pet stores from doing business, but it will reduce the burden on our shelters and rescue groups by increasing pet adoptions. It will also benefit our local hobby breeders by allowing them to continue providing responsibly bred animals directly to those who cannot find what they are looking for through adoption. Please consider passing a humane pet store ordinance for our community.
    54 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Amy M. Picture
  • Save Cats in the Bronx
    In order to create compassionate no-kill communities and achieve no-kill for cats nationwide, we need communities to support lifesaving programs like Trap-Neuter-Return [TNR]. The process is simple: cats are caught (often by volunteers), evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, and returned to their original outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. These programs are also proven to be the most cost-effective, veterinarian-approved, and animal-friendly solution for controlling and reducing free-roaming cat populations.
    151 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Briara M.
  • Saving Cats in Our Community
    In order to create compassionate no-kill communities and achieve no-kill for cats nationwide, we need communities to support lifesaving programs like Trap-Neuter-Return [TNR]. The process is simple: cats are caught (often by volunteers), evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, and returned to their original outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. These programs are also proven to be the most cost-effective, veterinarian-approved, and animal-friendly solution for controlling and reducing free-roaming cat populations.
    47 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Kim S.
  • Tell your supervisor to support animal resources for Yuba County people and pets
    Yuba County is a community that cares for its neighbors. Your voice should lead the way in creating a community that helps it people and its animals. Pets play an important role, let’s work together to keep them safe. The people and pets in Yuba County deserve programs that focus on providing safe and positive outlets for cats and dogs entering shelters. You are a critical part of ensuring that pets and people have access to positive programs and resources. It is important your supervisor knows that saving cats and dogs is important to the community. Some examples of these programs include community cat programming (to ensure cats are spayed/neutered, vaccinated, and returned to their homes), foster programming (to provide temporary housing to pets prior to finding their permanent homes), and progressive field services and resources to ensure people have what they need to keep their pets. By advocating for these programs and continued collaboration with other community organizations, you can be part of creating a healthier community for pets and people. Show your support by signing and sharing today! More info on cat programming and its importance: Around two-thirds of the animals being killed in shelters nationwide are cats. Cats need community support to ensure that they have safe, positive placement outside of animal shelters. Community cat programs utilize trap-neuter-return (TNR) which is an animal-friendly, veterinarian-approved, and cost-effective method for keeping free-roaming cats safe, healthy, and out of shelters — while reducing their numbers over time. The cats are humanely trapped then sterilized and vaccinated before being returned to the place where they were found. Reference the facts: Community cats and public health: https://www.felineresearch.org/post/issue-brief-feral-cats-and-public-health TNR and population management: https://www.felineresearch.org/post/issue-brief-what-to-do-with-feral-cats-examining-tnr Cat health and welfare with TNR: https://www.felineresearch.org/post/issue-brief-feral-cat-health
    53 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Kaitlyn S. Picture
  • End Breed-Restrictive Insurance Practices in California
    There is a wide range of dogs falling within the category of “risk” breeds according to some insurance companies including Boxers, Giant Schnauzers, German Shepherds, Chows, Great Danes, Alaskan Malamutes, American Staffordshire Terriers, Akitas, Cane Corsos, American Bulldogs, Belgian Malinois, Keeshonds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Ovtcharkas, Siberian Huskies, Dobermans, Pit Bulls, Dalmatians, Rottweilers, Australian Cattle dogs and more. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners [NAIC] should protect pet-owning consumers. Insurance companies should focus on the behavior of the dog. Dogs with aggressive behavior should not be protected by any moratorium. This is important because dogs are viewed by the vast majority of Americans as part of the family, and the ability for people to keep families together should be protected. Breed-restrictive insurance practices can force responsible pet owners to give up their pets and increase the number of pets in shelters. The likelihood a dog will bite is based on many factors such as socialization of the dog, obedience training, supervision provided by the owner, and how the victim interacts with the dog. It has not been proven by scientific evidence that aggressive behavior is present in any particular breed of dog. Insurance companies that want to reduce risk should focus solely on behavior of the dog and the behavior of the owner.
    1,178 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Caity K.
  • End Breed-Restrictive Insurance Practices in Florida
    There is a wide range of dogs falling within the category of “risk” breeds according to some insurance companies including Boxers, Giant Schnauzers, German Shepherds, Chows, Great Danes, Alaskan Malamutes, American Staffordshire Terriers, Akitas, Cane Corsos, American Bulldogs, Belgian Malinois, Keeshonds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Ovtcharkas, Siberian Huskies, Dobermans, Pit Bulls, Dalmatians, Rottweilers, Australian Cattle dogs and more. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners [NAIC] should protect pet-owning consumers. Insurance companies should focus on the behavior of the dog. Dogs with aggressive behavior should not be protected by any moratorium. This is important because dogs are viewed by the vast majority of Americans as part of the family, and the ability for people to keep families together should be protected. Breed-restrictive insurance practices can force responsible pet owners to give up their pets and increase the number of pets in shelters. The likelihood a dog will bite is based on many factors such as socialization of the dog, obedience training, supervision provided by the owner, and how the victim interacts with the dog. It has not been proven by scientific evidence that aggressive behavior is present in any particular breed of dog. Insurance companies that want to reduce risk should focus solely on behavior of the dog and the behavior of the owner.
    829 of 1,000 Signatures
  • End Breed-Restrictive Insurance Practices in Montana
    There is a wide range of dogs falling within the category of “risk” breeds according to some insurance companies including Boxers, Giant Schnauzers, German Shepherds, Chows, Great Danes, Alaskan Malamutes, American Staffordshire Terriers, Akitas, Cane Corsos, American Bulldogs, Belgian Malinois, Keeshonds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Ovtcharkas, Siberian Huskies, Dobermans, Pit Bulls, Dalmatians, Rottweilers, Australian Cattle dogs and more. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners [NAIC] should protect pet-owning consumers. Insurance companies should focus on the behavior of the dog. Dogs with aggressive behavior should not be protected by any moratorium. This is important because dogs are viewed by the vast majority of Americans as part of the family, and the ability for people to keep families together should be protected. Breed-restrictive insurance practices can force responsible pet owners to give up their pets and increase the number of pets in shelters. The likelihood a dog will bite is based on many factors such as socialization of the dog, obedience training, supervision provided by the owner, and how the victim interacts with the dog. It has not been proven by scientific evidence that aggressive behavior is present in any particular breed of dog. Insurance companies that want to reduce risk should focus solely on behavior of the dog and the behavior of the owner.
    53 of 100 Signatures
  • End Breed-Restrictive Insurance Practices in Indiana
    There is a wide range of dogs falling within the category of “risk” breeds according to some insurance companies including Boxers, Giant Schnauzers, German Shepherds, Chows, Great Danes, Alaskan Malamutes, American Staffordshire Terriers, Akitas, Cane Corsos, American Bulldogs, Belgian Malinois, Keeshonds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Ovtcharkas, Siberian Huskies, Dobermans, Pit Bulls, Dalmatians, Rottweilers, Australian Cattle dogs and more. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners [NAIC] should protect pet-owning consumers. Insurance companies should focus on the behavior of the dog. Dogs with aggressive behavior should not be protected by any moratorium. This is important because dogs are viewed by the vast majority of Americans as part of the family, and the ability for people to keep families together should be protected. Breed-restrictive insurance practices can force responsible pet owners to give up their pets and increase the number of pets in shelters. The likelihood a dog will bite is based on many factors such as socialization of the dog, obedience training, supervision provided by the owner, and how the victim interacts with the dog. It has not been proven by scientific evidence that aggressive behavior is present in any particular breed of dog. Insurance companies that want to reduce risk should focus solely on behavior of the dog and the behavior of the owner.
    100 of 200 Signatures
  • End Breed-Restrictive Insurance Practices in Missouri
    There is a wide range of dogs falling within the category of “risk” breeds according to some insurance companies including Boxers, Giant Schnauzers, German Shepherds, Chows, Great Danes, Alaskan Malamutes, American Staffordshire Terriers, Akitas, Cane Corsos, American Bulldogs, Belgian Malinois, Keeshonds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Ovtcharkas, Siberian Huskies, Dobermans, Pit Bulls, Dalmatians, Rottweilers, Australian Cattle dogs and more. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners [NAIC] should protect pet-owning consumers. Insurance companies should focus on the behavior of the dog. Dogs with aggressive behavior should not be protected by any moratorium. This is important because dogs are viewed by the vast majority of Americans as part of the family, and the ability for people to keep families together should be protected. Breed-restrictive insurance practices can force responsible pet owners to give up their pets and increase the number of pets in shelters. The likelihood a dog will bite is based on many factors such as socialization of the dog, obedience training, supervision provided by the owner, and how the victim interacts with the dog. It has not been proven by scientific evidence that aggressive behavior is present in any particular breed of dog. Insurance companies that want to reduce risk should focus solely on behavior of the dog and the behavior of the owner.
    144 of 200 Signatures
  • End Breed-Restrictive Insurance Practices in Puerto Rico
    There is a wide range of dogs falling within the category of “risk” breeds according to some insurance companies including Boxers, Giant Schnauzers, German Shepherds, Chows, Great Danes, Alaskan Malamutes, American Staffordshire Terriers, Akitas, Cane Corsos, American Bulldogs, Belgian Malinois, Keeshonds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Ovtcharkas, Siberian Huskies, Dobermans, Pit Bulls, Dalmatians, Rottweilers, Australian Cattle dogs and more. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners [NAIC] should protect pet-owning consumers. Insurance companies should focus on the behavior of the dog. Dogs with aggressive behavior should not be protected by any moratorium. This is important because dogs are viewed by the vast majority of Americans as part of the family, and the ability for people to keep families together should be protected. Breed-restrictive insurance practices can force responsible pet owners to give up their pets and increase the number of pets in shelters. The likelihood a dog will bite is based on many factors such as socialization of the dog, obedience training, supervision provided by the owner, and how the victim interacts with the dog. It has not been proven by scientific evidence that aggressive behavior is present in any particular breed of dog. Insurance companies that want to reduce risk should focus solely on behavior of the dog and the behavior of the owner.
    45 of 100 Signatures
  • End Breed-Restrictive Insurance Practices in Virginia
    There is a wide range of dogs falling within the category of “risk” breeds according to some insurance companies including Boxers, Giant Schnauzers, German Shepherds, Chows, Great Danes, Alaskan Malamutes, American Staffordshire Terriers, Akitas, Cane Corsos, American Bulldogs, Belgian Malinois, Keeshonds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Ovtcharkas, Siberian Huskies, Dobermans, Pit Bulls, Dalmatians, Rottweilers, Australian Cattle dogs and more. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners [NAIC] should protect pet-owning consumers. Insurance companies should focus on the behavior of the dog. Dogs with aggressive behavior should not be protected by any moratorium. This is important because dogs are viewed by the vast majority of Americans as part of the family, and the ability for people to keep families together should be protected. Breed-restrictive insurance practices can force responsible pet owners to give up their pets and increase the number of pets in shelters. The likelihood a dog will bite is based on many factors such as socialization of the dog, obedience training, supervision provided by the owner, and how the victim interacts with the dog. It has not been proven by scientific evidence that aggressive behavior is present in any particular breed of dog. Insurance companies that want to reduce risk should focus solely on behavior of the dog and the behavior of the owner.
    304 of 400 Signatures
  • End Breed-Restrictive Insurance Practices in Maine
    There is a wide range of dogs falling within the category of “risk” breeds according to some insurance companies including Boxers, Giant Schnauzers, German Shepherds, Chows, Great Danes, Alaskan Malamutes, American Staffordshire Terriers, Akitas, Cane Corsos, American Bulldogs, Belgian Malinois, Keeshonds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Ovtcharkas, Siberian Huskies, Dobermans, Pit Bulls, Dalmatians, Rottweilers, Australian Cattle dogs and more. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners [NAIC] should protect pet-owning consumers. Insurance companies should focus on the behavior of the dog. Dogs with aggressive behavior should not be protected by any moratorium. This is important because dogs are viewed by the vast majority of Americans as part of the family, and the ability for people to keep families together should be protected. Breed-restrictive insurance practices can force responsible pet owners to give up their pets and increase the number of pets in shelters. The likelihood a dog will bite is based on many factors such as socialization of the dog, obedience training, supervision provided by the owner, and how the victim interacts with the dog. It has not been proven by scientific evidence that aggressive behavior is present in any particular breed of dog. Insurance companies that want to reduce risk should focus solely on behavior of the dog and the behavior of the owner.
    82 of 100 Signatures