• Saving Cats in Our Community
    In order to create compassionate no-kill communities and achieve no-kill for cats nationwide, we need communities to support lifesaving programs like Trap-Neuter-Return [TNR]. The process is simple: cats are caught (often by volunteers), evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, and returned to their original outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. These programs are also proven to be the most cost-effective, veterinarian-approved, and animal-friendly solution for controlling and reducing free-roaming cat populations.
    31 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Jennifer G.
  • Lubbock city officials: we support animal shelter programming in Lubbock
    Sometimes when you want to create change in your community, it's hard to know where to begin. Together we can make sustainable changes that save lives while creating a framework of support for the pets of Lubbock and the people who care about them. Animals who end up at the animal shelter are part of this community and county officials need to know the people of Lubbock care about the whole community- pets and people. Supporting our community means supporting our shelter and programs that focus on providing safe and positive outlets for cats and dogs entering shelters. It is important your representatives know that saving cats and dogs is important to the people of Lubbock and that you support providing resources needed to do so. Some examples of resources include community cat programming (to ensure cats are spayed/neutered, vaccinated, and returned to their homes), foster programming (to provide temporary housing to pets prior to finding their permanent homes), adoption outlets, and progressive field services and resources to ensure people have what they need to keep their pets. By advocating for these programs and continued collaboration with and support of your local animal shelter, you can be part of creating a healthier community for pets and people. Show your support by signing and sharing today!
    129 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Kaitlyn S. Picture
  • Stop Puppy Mill Sales in Our Community
    More than 400 other cities, counties and states have already passed laws to ban the retail sale of pets sourced from commercial breeding facilities. It's time for our community to do the same. Puppy and kitten mills are in business to supply pet stores. The pets in these facilities often spend their entire lives in dirty, crowded cages for the sole purpose of producing as many animals as possible for the retail pet trade. Pet stores that obtain animals from these facilities are not an asset to our city. These facilities also produce puppies that are often sick, causing unsuspecting consumers to have to care for a new pet in need of expensive veterinary treatment. Milled puppies can also spread campylobacter, a dangerous, drug-resistant bacteria that is contagious to humans. Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) traced a multi-state outbreak of Campylobacter to pet store puppies. This is a public health risk in a time where public health should be a top priority. A retail pet sales ban will not prevent pet stores from doing business, but it will reduce the burden on our shelters and rescue groups by increasing pet adoptions. It will also benefit our local hobby breeders by allowing them to continue providing responsibly bred animals directly to those who cannot find what they are looking for through adoption. Please consider passing a humane pet store ordinance for our community.
    65 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Sophia A. Picture
  • Stop Puppy Mill Sales in Knoxville
    More than 400 other cities, counties and states have already passed laws to ban the retail sale of pets sourced from commercial breeding facilities. It's time for our community to do the same. Puppy and kitten mills are in business to supply pet stores. The pets in these facilities often spend their entire lives in dirty, crowded cages for the sole purpose of producing as many animals as possible for the retail pet trade. Pet stores that obtain animals from these facilities are not an asset to our city. These facilities also produce puppies that are often sick, causing unsuspecting consumers to have to care for a new pet in need of expensive veterinary treatment. Milled puppies can also spread campylobacter, a dangerous, drug-resistant bacteria that is contagious to humans. Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) traced a multi-state outbreak of Campylobacter to pet store puppies. This is a public health risk in a time where public health should be a top priority. A retail pet sales ban will not prevent pet stores from doing business, but it will reduce the burden on our shelters and rescue groups by increasing pet adoptions. It will also benefit our local hobby breeders by allowing them to continue providing responsibly bred animals directly to those who cannot find what they are looking for through adoption. Please consider supporting a humane pet store ordinance for our community.
    109 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Wyatt B. Picture
  • Saving Cats in Our Community
    In order to create compassionate no-kill communities and achieve no-kill for cats nationwide, we need communities to support lifesaving programs like Trap-Neuter-Return [TNR]. The process is simple: cats are caught (often by volunteers), evaluated by veterinarians, vaccinated, spayed or neutered, and returned to their original outdoor homes, unable to have kittens. These programs are also proven to be the most cost-effective, veterinarian-approved, and animal-friendly solution for controlling and reducing free-roaming cat populations.
    85 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Angie L. Picture
  • Tell city officials: support animal shelter programming in Clovis
    Sometimes when you want to create change in your community, it's hard to know where to begin. We work with local advocates like you to make sustainable changes that save lives while creating a framework of support for the pets of Clovis and the people who care about them. Animals who end up at the county shelter are part of this community and county officials need to know the people of Clovis care about the whole community- pets and people. The people and pets in Clovis deserve programs that focus on providing safe and positive outlets for cats and dogs entering shelters. In 2020, 66% of all animals entering the shelter left alive and only 32% of cats entering the shelter left alive. It is important your representatives know that saving cats and dogs is important to the people of Clovis. In order to create change at the shelter- programs that are proven to be effective at saving animals lives and fiscally responsible need to be implemented at the shelter and supported by the community. The good news is that you can be a part of supporting positive programs that are working around New Mexico. Some examples include community cat programming (to ensure cats are spayed/neutered, vaccinated, and returned to their homes), foster programming (to provide temporary housing to pets prior to finding their permanent homes), adoption outlets, and progressive field services and resources to ensure people have what they need to keep their pets. By advocating for these programs and continued collaboration with other community organizations, you can be part of creating a healthier community for pets and people. Show your support by signing and sharing today!
    326 of 400 Signatures
    Created by High Plains Humane S.
  • End ban on pit bulls in Ottumwa, Iowa
    Cities everywhere are deciding to revise these discriminatory bans to hold owners responsible no matter the breed or mix a dog is. This ban has not worked in keeping pitbull out of the city limits, it relies on out of town rescues and shelters to remove these types of dogs , stretching our neighbors resources is not being a responsible community.
    1,464 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Marcia M.
  • Helping Community Cats in Bullhead City
    We Care for Animals was founded in 2016 with the experience and knowledge that Trap-Neuter-Return is the only humane and solid solution to lower the population of Community Cats, not only are they sterilized they are vaccinated and receive a health check.
    119 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Rebecca S.
  • Consider being a “pet inclusive“ landlord to increase your profitability
    Becoming pet-inclusive: The right thing to do. A 1998 study found that 29 percent of pet relinquishments to animal shelters were because of housing issues, primarily having to move. And the most common specific reason given for relinquishment was “landlord refused to allow pets.” Tragically, this percentage has probably increased with the foreclosure crisis. Every day, more than 950 cats and dogs are unnecessarily killed in America’s shelters, simply because they don’t have a home. Each one of these pets is an individual and a valued life worth saving. That number should be zero, and it can be, if landlords and property management companies do their part to make more pet-inclusive housing available. Lead by example. Together, we can Save Them All.
    41 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Jill G. Picture
  • Alabamians want access to veterinary care
    In Alabama, 17 counties have no animal services at all - no veterinarians, no animal shelters, no animal clinics. Across the state, only five low-cost spay/neuter clinics serve Alabamians. This is considerably fewer clinics per capita than other states in the southeast. Current laws say it is unlawful for a licensed veterinarian to be an employee of a non-licensed person. For this reason, veterinarians must be treated as outside contractors when they provide services in animal shelters and low cost spay/neuter clinics which limits employment opportunities. This takes away the freedom of veterinarians to seek employment of their own interest and hampers individuals and animal shelters access to animal services. Alabama’s current veterinary practice law overly restricts affordable access to essential veterinary care for community residents and animal shelters. This creates unnecessary risk to public health. The people and animal shelters in Alabama need the ability to give basic, affordable veterinary services to the animals in their care. You are a critical part of ensuring that pets and people receive essential resources and our community stays safe. The people and pets in Alabama deserve access to basic veterinary care. It is important you tell your representative that saving cats and dogs, and keeping communities safe, is important to the people of Alabama. By advocating for access to care and continued collaboration with other community organizations, you are a part of creating a healthier community for pets and people. Show your support by signing and sharing today!
    1,467 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Bobbi Y.
  • Stand together for the pets and people of El Paso
    You can play a pivotal role in this effort and the work happening in El Paso to ensure El Paso is the most humane and kind community we can be. We need you and your voice to be a part of this community effort! El Paso Animal Services is working hard to ensure access to programs that save animals lives and create a healthier community for people and pets including community cat programs, access to adoptable animals, and animal foster programs. These programs are already working around the country and in El Paso but we need your support to ensure their continued success. Sign and share this to help support the work being done in El Paso and ensure this is a local effort, built by community members who work collaboratively to make sustainable changes so more pets can live happy, healthy lives in the communities and with the families they call home.
    150 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Kaitlyn S. Picture
  • Eliminate burdensome requirements for Illinois foster programs
    In July 2021, the Illinois Department of Agriculture (IDOA) published proposed amendments to the state’s Animal Welfare Act. The proposed amendments provide many positive improvements for dogs and cats in Illinois. However, some of the well-meaning amendments would make it difficult for shelters to maintain their foster programs. Shelters, like so many places, are under strain. With pandemic restrictions being reduced or eliminated, many people are traveling or returning to work. That means fostering and adoptions are returning to pre-pandemic levels. We need the state to find the right balance of making fostering less difficult for animal shelters and their volunteers while maintaining a safe environment for the dogs and cats. Help make it better for animal shelters to implement lifesaving foster programs. The deadline for submitting comments is August 30, so please sign and share the petition today.
    826 of 1,000 Signatures
    Created by Ledy V.