• End Dog Breed Bans in Minot, North Dakota
    Cities across the nation are revising breed bans to hold owners responsible no matter the breed or mix of a dog. The current breed ban in Minot has not worked in keeping pitbull looking dogs out of the city limits, it has instead pushed the breed into towns without a restriction and forced families to move into surrounding cities due to fear of their beloved family pet being impounded and euthanized at Minot Pound and Animal Control due to the breed ban. We all want safe and humane communities for people and pets. Breed bans are an outdated, ineffective approach to public safety. It is a waste of taxpayer dollars because it is expensive to enforce and violates the rights of dog owners. All Americans who follow safety rules and laws should be allowed to own whatever breed of dog they choose. It is that simple. A 2014 national survey revealed that 84% of Americans believe the government should not tell them what kind of breed of dog they can own. (2) Cities should enact comprehensive, breed-neutral ordinances that focus on the behavior of the dog and the behavior of the owner. The goal of public safety should be achieved in the most effective and most thorough way possible. To make the breed ban situation worse, SVAS has drawn focus from their ability to be a safehaven for the breed in the city. The City of Minot’s animal control division is solely responsible for determining whether a person’s private property (their dog) is a particular breed based on physical appearance alone. It is also their decision to euthanize these animals based on appearance. They have shown an unwillingness to work with SVAS on this issue and have threatened citations against staff for working with dogs who look a certain way. These breeds within SVAS care are being targeted based on physical appearance alone which has been proven to be unreliable and open to interpretation. These outdated practices are opposed by many organizations including the American Kennel Club, American Veterinary Medical Association, and National Animal Care and Control Association. On June 29th, the Chief of Police in Minot issued a letter stating that SVAS can no longer house “pitbulls” after 40+ years of having the ability to be the safehaven for the breed in the city. Per the ordinance he referenced, breeds that are banned in the city can be “destroyed”, therefore causing unnecessary death and irresponsible use of tax payer dollars. The Minot Pound is the last large-scale facility in North Dakota that has not reached no-kill and Minot is the last community keeping North Dakota from being a no-kill state. SVAS is working hard to fill this community gap and focus on helping healthy, adoptable, and safe dogs find homes regardless of physical appearance. Allowing policies to backtrack to a more targeted implementation of an outdated breed ban, could significantly impact the progress made in Minot, North Dakota. By reverting this practice to a more kill focused model, Minot could lose the animal lifesaving progress fought so hard for by the people of this community. Together, we can work together to move our community forward. Sign the petition to end the Breed Ban in Minot, North Dakota. Research on breed and behavior: (1) Studies done in countries with breed-discriminatory laws, including the United Kingdom, Spain and Germany, found that these laws didn’t reduce the number of dog bites or improve public safety. “World-Wide Failure of Breed Specific Legislation,” National Canine Research Council, http://www.nationalcanineresearchcouncil.com/uploaded_files/tinymce/Worldwide%20Failure%20of%20BSL.pdf (2) Luntz Global Omnibus Poll, January 2014 * Researchers at Tufts University concluded that factors associated with actions of the owner —like the absence of an able-bodied person to intervene — are the primary cause of dog bite-related fatalities while the breed is not a factor. Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24299544 * A recent study asked 16 animal shelter workers to guess the breed of 120 dogs. While the shelter staff collectively identified 52% of the dogs as pit bull-type dogs, DNA tests proved that only 21% had any pit bull mix in them. Source: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S109002331500310X * A study published in the Journal of Veterinary Behavior compared aggression between banned dog breeds and a control group of golden retrievers using temperament tests. Comparing the results of golden retrievers and breeds affected by breed discriminatory legislation, no significant difference was found. The researchers concluded that "A scientific basis for breed-specific lists does not exist." Source: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S155878780700264X
    3,340 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by Souris Valley Animal Shelter
  • End ban on pit bulls in Ottumwa, Iowa
    Cities everywhere are deciding to revise these discriminatory bans to hold owners responsible no matter the breed or mix a dog is. This ban has not worked in keeping pitbull out of the city limits, it relies on out of town rescues and shelters to remove these types of dogs , stretching our neighbors resources is not being a responsible community.
    1,469 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Marcia M.
  • Poner fin a las prácticas de seguros que restringen la raza en Illinois
    Hay una gran variedad de perros que entran en la categoría de razas "de riesgo" según algunas compañías de seguros, como los bóxers, los schnauzers gigantes, los pastores alemanes, los chows, los gran daneses, los malamutes de Alaska, los staffordshire terrier americanos, los akitas, los corsos de Caña, los bulldogs americanos, los malinois belgas, los keeshonds, los ridgebacks de Rodesia, los ovtcharkas, los huskies siberianos, los dobermans, los pitbulls, los dálmatas, los rottweilers y los perros boyeros australianos, entre otros. La Asociación Nacional de Comisarios de Seguros [NAIC] debería proteger a los consumidores propietarios de mascotas. Las compañías de seguros deberían centrarse en el comportamiento del perro. Los perros con comportamiento agresivo no deberían estar protegidos por ninguna moratoria. Esto es importante porque los perros son vistos por la gran mayoría de los estadounidenses como parte de la familia, y la capacidad de las personas para mantener las familias unidas debe ser protegida. Las prácticas de seguro restrictivas en materia de razas pueden obligar a los propietarios responsables de mascotas a renunciar a ellas y aumentar el número de mascotas en los refugios. La probabilidad de que un perro muerda se basa en muchos factores, como la socialización del perro, el adiestramiento de obediencia, la supervisión proporcionada por el propietario y la forma en que la víctima interactúa con el perro. No se ha demostrado científicamente que el comportamiento agresivo esté presente en ninguna raza de perro en particular. Las compañías de seguros que quieran reducir el riesgo deben centrarse únicamente en el comportamiento del perro y en la conducta del propietario.
    76 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Caity K.
  • Poner fin a las prácticas de seguros que restringen la raza en Arizona
    Hay una gran variedad de perros que entran en la categoría de razas "de riesgo" según algunas compañías de seguros, como los bóxers, los schnauzers gigantes, los pastores alemanes, los chows, los gran daneses, los malamutes de Alaska, los staffordshire terrier americanos, los akitas, los corsos de Caña, los bulldogs americanos, los malinois belgas, los keeshonds, los ridgebacks de Rodesia, los ovtcharkas, los huskies siberianos, los dobermans, los pitbulls, los dálmatas, los rottweilers y los perros boyeros australianos, entre otros. La Asociación Nacional de Comisarios de Seguros [NAIC] debería proteger a los consumidores propietarios de mascotas. Las compañías de seguros deberían centrarse en el comportamiento del perro. Los perros con comportamiento agresivo no deberían estar protegidos por ninguna moratoria. Esto es importante porque los perros son vistos por la gran mayoría de los estadounidenses como parte de la familia, y la capacidad de las personas para mantener las familias unidas debe ser protegida. Las prácticas de seguro restrictivas en materia de razas pueden obligar a los propietarios responsables de mascotas a renunciar a ellas y aumentar el número de mascotas en los refugios. La probabilidad de que un perro muerda se basa en muchos factores, como la socialización del perro, el adiestramiento de obediencia, la supervisión proporcionada por el propietario y la forma en que la víctima interactúa con el perro. No se ha demostrado científicamente que el comportamiento agresivo esté presente en ninguna raza de perro en particular. Las compañías de seguros que quieran reducir el riesgo deben centrarse únicamente en el comportamiento del perro y en la conducta del propietario.
    66 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Caity K.
  • Poner fin a las prácticas de seguros que restringen la raza en Florida
    Hay una gran variedad de perros que entran en la categoría de razas "de riesgo" según algunas compañías de seguros, como los bóxers, los schnauzers gigantes, los pastores alemanes, los chows, los gran daneses, los malamutes de Alaska, los staffordshire terrier americanos, los akitas, los corsos de Caña, los bulldogs americanos, los malinois belgas, los keeshonds, los ridgebacks de Rodesia, los ovtcharkas, los huskies siberianos, los dobermans, los pitbulls, los dálmatas, los rottweilers y los perros boyeros australianos, entre otros. La Asociación Nacional de Comisarios de Seguros [NAIC] debería proteger a los consumidores propietarios de mascotas. Las compañías de seguros deberían centrarse en el comportamiento del perro. Los perros con comportamiento agresivo no deberían estar protegidos por ninguna moratoria. Esto es importante porque los perros son vistos por la gran mayoría de los estadounidenses como parte de la familia, y la capacidad de las personas para mantener las familias unidas debe ser protegida. Las prácticas de seguro restrictivas en materia de razas pueden obligar a los propietarios responsables de mascotas a renunciar a ellas y aumentar el número de mascotas en los refugios. La probabilidad de que un perro muerda se basa en muchos factores, como la socialización del perro, el adiestramiento de obediencia, la supervisión proporcionada por el propietario y la forma en que la víctima interactúa con el perro. No se ha demostrado científicamente que el comportamiento agresivo esté presente en ninguna raza de perro en particular. Las compañías de seguros que quieran reducir el riesgo deben centrarse únicamente en el comportamiento del perro y en la conducta del propietario.
    104 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Caity K.
  • Poner fin a las prácticas de seguros que restringen la raza en Texas
    Hay una gran variedad de perros que entran en la categoría de razas "de riesgo" según algunas compañías de seguros, como los bóxers, los schnauzers gigantes, los pastores alemanes, los chows, los gran daneses, los malamutes de Alaska, los staffordshire terrier americanos, los akitas, los corsos de Caña, los bulldogs americanos, los malinois belgas, los keeshonds, los ridgebacks de Rodesia, los ovtcharkas, los huskies siberianos, los dobermans, los pitbulls, los dálmatas, los rottweilers y los perros boyeros australianos, entre otros. La Asociación Nacional de Comisarios de Seguros [NAIC] debería proteger a los consumidores propietarios de mascotas. Las compañías de seguros deberían centrarse en el comportamiento del perro. Los perros con comportamiento agresivo no deberían estar protegidos por ninguna moratoria. Esto es importante porque los perros son vistos por la gran mayoría de los estadounidenses como parte de la familia, y la capacidad de las personas para mantener las familias unidas debe ser protegida. Las prácticas de seguro restrictivas en materia de razas pueden obligar a los propietarios responsables de mascotas a renunciar a ellas y aumentar el número de mascotas en los refugios. La probabilidad de que un perro muerda se basa en muchos factores, como la socialización del perro, el adiestramiento de obediencia, la supervisión proporcionada por el propietario y la forma en que la víctima interactúa con el perro. No se ha demostrado científicamente que el comportamiento agresivo esté presente en ninguna raza de perro en particular. Las compañías de seguros que quieran reducir el riesgo deben centrarse únicamente en el comportamiento del perro y en la conducta del propietario.
    72 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Caity K.
  • Poner fin a las prácticas de seguros que restringen la raza en California
    Hay una gran variedad de perros que entran en la categoría de razas "de riesgo" según algunas compañías de seguros, como los bóxers, los schnauzers gigantes, los pastores alemanes, los chows, los gran daneses, los malamutes de Alaska, los staffordshire terrier americanos, los akitas, los corsos de Caña, los bulldogs americanos, los malinois belgas, los keeshonds, los ridgebacks de Rodesia, los ovtcharkas, los huskies siberianos, los dobermans, los pitbulls, los dálmatas, los rottweilers y los perros boyeros australianos, entre otros. La Asociación Nacional de Comisarios de Seguros [NAIC] debería proteger a los consumidores propietarios de mascotas. Las compañías de seguros deberían centrarse en el comportamiento del perro. Los perros con comportamiento agresivo no deberían estar protegidos por ninguna moratoria. Esto es importante porque los perros son vistos por la gran mayoría de los estadounidenses como parte de la familia, y la capacidad de las personas para mantener las familias unidas debe ser protegida. Las prácticas de seguro restrictivas en materia de razas pueden obligar a los propietarios responsables de mascotas a renunciar a ellas y aumentar el número de mascotas en los refugios. La probabilidad de que un perro muerda se basa en muchos factores, como la socialización del perro, el adiestramiento de obediencia, la supervisión proporcionada por el propietario y la forma en que la víctima interactúa con el perro. No se ha demostrado científicamente que el comportamiento agresivo esté presente en ninguna raza de perro en particular. Las compañías de seguros que quieran reducir el riesgo deben centrarse únicamente en el comportamiento del perro y en la conducta del propietario.
    97 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Caity K.
  • End Breed-Restrictive Insurance Practices in California
    There is a wide range of dogs falling within the category of “risk” breeds according to some insurance companies including Boxers, Giant Schnauzers, German Shepherds, Chows, Great Danes, Alaskan Malamutes, American Staffordshire Terriers, Akitas, Cane Corsos, American Bulldogs, Belgian Malinois, Keeshonds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Ovtcharkas, Siberian Huskies, Dobermans, Pit Bulls, Dalmatians, Rottweilers, Australian Cattle dogs and more. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners [NAIC] should protect pet-owning consumers. Insurance companies should focus on the behavior of the dog. Dogs with aggressive behavior should not be protected by any moratorium. This is important because dogs are viewed by the vast majority of Americans as part of the family, and the ability for people to keep families together should be protected. Breed-restrictive insurance practices can force responsible pet owners to give up their pets and increase the number of pets in shelters. The likelihood a dog will bite is based on many factors such as socialization of the dog, obedience training, supervision provided by the owner, and how the victim interacts with the dog. It has not been proven by scientific evidence that aggressive behavior is present in any particular breed of dog. Insurance companies that want to reduce risk should focus solely on behavior of the dog and the behavior of the owner.
    2,223 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Caity K.
  • End Breed-Restrictive Insurance Practices in Florida
    There is a wide range of dogs falling within the category of “risk” breeds according to some insurance companies including Boxers, Giant Schnauzers, German Shepherds, Chows, Great Danes, Alaskan Malamutes, American Staffordshire Terriers, Akitas, Cane Corsos, American Bulldogs, Belgian Malinois, Keeshonds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Ovtcharkas, Siberian Huskies, Dobermans, Pit Bulls, Dalmatians, Rottweilers, Australian Cattle dogs and more. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners [NAIC] should protect pet-owning consumers. Insurance companies should focus on the behavior of the dog. Dogs with aggressive behavior should not be protected by any moratorium. This is important because dogs are viewed by the vast majority of Americans as part of the family, and the ability for people to keep families together should be protected. Breed-restrictive insurance practices can force responsible pet owners to give up their pets and increase the number of pets in shelters. The likelihood a dog will bite is based on many factors such as socialization of the dog, obedience training, supervision provided by the owner, and how the victim interacts with the dog. It has not been proven by scientific evidence that aggressive behavior is present in any particular breed of dog. Insurance companies that want to reduce risk should focus solely on behavior of the dog and the behavior of the owner.
    1,618 of 2,000 Signatures
  • End Breed-Restrictive Insurance Practices in Montana
    There is a wide range of dogs falling within the category of “risk” breeds according to some insurance companies including Boxers, Giant Schnauzers, German Shepherds, Chows, Great Danes, Alaskan Malamutes, American Staffordshire Terriers, Akitas, Cane Corsos, American Bulldogs, Belgian Malinois, Keeshonds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Ovtcharkas, Siberian Huskies, Dobermans, Pit Bulls, Dalmatians, Rottweilers, Australian Cattle dogs and more. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners [NAIC] should protect pet-owning consumers. Insurance companies should focus on the behavior of the dog. Dogs with aggressive behavior should not be protected by any moratorium. This is important because dogs are viewed by the vast majority of Americans as part of the family, and the ability for people to keep families together should be protected. Breed-restrictive insurance practices can force responsible pet owners to give up their pets and increase the number of pets in shelters. The likelihood a dog will bite is based on many factors such as socialization of the dog, obedience training, supervision provided by the owner, and how the victim interacts with the dog. It has not been proven by scientific evidence that aggressive behavior is present in any particular breed of dog. Insurance companies that want to reduce risk should focus solely on behavior of the dog and the behavior of the owner.
    112 of 200 Signatures
  • End Breed-Restrictive Insurance Practices in Indiana
    There is a wide range of dogs falling within the category of “risk” breeds according to some insurance companies including Boxers, Giant Schnauzers, German Shepherds, Chows, Great Danes, Alaskan Malamutes, American Staffordshire Terriers, Akitas, Cane Corsos, American Bulldogs, Belgian Malinois, Keeshonds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Ovtcharkas, Siberian Huskies, Dobermans, Pit Bulls, Dalmatians, Rottweilers, Australian Cattle dogs and more. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners [NAIC] should protect pet-owning consumers. Insurance companies should focus on the behavior of the dog. Dogs with aggressive behavior should not be protected by any moratorium. This is important because dogs are viewed by the vast majority of Americans as part of the family, and the ability for people to keep families together should be protected. Breed-restrictive insurance practices can force responsible pet owners to give up their pets and increase the number of pets in shelters. The likelihood a dog will bite is based on many factors such as socialization of the dog, obedience training, supervision provided by the owner, and how the victim interacts with the dog. It has not been proven by scientific evidence that aggressive behavior is present in any particular breed of dog. Insurance companies that want to reduce risk should focus solely on behavior of the dog and the behavior of the owner.
    364 of 400 Signatures
  • End Breed-Restrictive Insurance Practices in Missouri
    There is a wide range of dogs falling within the category of “risk” breeds according to some insurance companies including Boxers, Giant Schnauzers, German Shepherds, Chows, Great Danes, Alaskan Malamutes, American Staffordshire Terriers, Akitas, Cane Corsos, American Bulldogs, Belgian Malinois, Keeshonds, Rhodesian Ridgebacks, Ovtcharkas, Siberian Huskies, Dobermans, Pit Bulls, Dalmatians, Rottweilers, Australian Cattle dogs and more. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners [NAIC] should protect pet-owning consumers. Insurance companies should focus on the behavior of the dog. Dogs with aggressive behavior should not be protected by any moratorium. This is important because dogs are viewed by the vast majority of Americans as part of the family, and the ability for people to keep families together should be protected. Breed-restrictive insurance practices can force responsible pet owners to give up their pets and increase the number of pets in shelters. The likelihood a dog will bite is based on many factors such as socialization of the dog, obedience training, supervision provided by the owner, and how the victim interacts with the dog. It has not been proven by scientific evidence that aggressive behavior is present in any particular breed of dog. Insurance companies that want to reduce risk should focus solely on behavior of the dog and the behavior of the owner.
    375 of 400 Signatures